A Nelson doctor sentenced to home detention after covertly filming his female colleagues has won his bid to stay in the profession. Photo: File.

Convicted Nelson doctor keeps licence

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A Nelson doctor sentenced to home detention after covertly filming his female colleagues has won his bid to stay in the profession.

Samuel John Simpson Wilson was last year convicted in the Nelson District Court on eight charges of making an intimate visual recording between June 2012 and April 2015.

He was sentenced to seven months’ home detention.

Wilson used a USB stick disguised as a door opener and attached to his car keys to record two women who changed in his bathroom at home, and a further 10 female colleagues from Nelson Hospital.

The 45-year-old cardiologist put the USBs in two different positions in the toilet area to record from different angles.

Visitors to Wilson’s family home were filmed entering the bathroom and using the toilet, including showing removal of clothing.

One charge referred to his holding and manipulating the camera while seated next to, and talking, to a female colleague so that he could film her exposed legs and up her skirt.

In a Health Practitioners Disciplinary Tribunal hearing, Wilson made no submissions and called no evidence in response and he accepted his convictions and conduct would likely bring discredit to the medical profession.

However, he did fight successfully to keep his medical registration and instead of cancellation, he was suspended for one year from the date of the hearing, on May 2019.

It was submitted for Wilson that a significant distinction was that the images did not involve children or abuse of children and it was said that Wilson “never intended any harm” to his victims.

The tribunal concluded that “this is not a case where such cancellation is necessary for protection of the public or maintenance of standards”.

It said Wilson had lost suppression and had his name printed many times so the public could make up their own minds as to whether to seek his medical help.

“The tribunal is of the view that cancellation of registration would be disproportionate and would result in a loss to the community of a medical practitioner who is well trained and has no clinical issues.”

The tribunal instead found that what was needed was for health supervision to “treat Dr Wilson’s behaviour and so prevent any repeat”.

“This can best be achieved by first an order for further suspension.”

– NZ Herald